Gathering Minds

Why I Do Not Favor The 'FreeZone'

At one time, I enjoyed the idea of being part of a ‘loosely’ organized group of people who had the purpose and intent of creating expanded spiritual awareness for those who had an interest in such things. Additionally, there was an added appeal of operating outside of the taken over Church of Scientology where true spiritual freedom was severely restricted if not actually discouraged. In a spiritually based group, the idea of ‘group-think’ being vacant is, as anyone would guess, refreshing. It would be refreshing because the granting of beingness would rate higher than the pursuit of individual personalities and egos.

This has proved not to be the case with the ‘FreeZone’.

For several years, without anyone else being involved or helping in any way, I created the Free Zone America web site (FZA.ORG). I did this work because of my desire to persue a road of spirituality. No one from the ‘loosely’ organized group of individuals called the ‘FreeZone’ persued ANY connection to FZA.ORG other than for individual gain of some sort or another.

This all changed when the prime instigator, Ralph Hilton became upset with the way that I ran FZA.ORG.

Personally, I find no reason to mettle with the affairs of someone else’s web site. Whatever the owner wishes to do is of their concern. After all, I have no authority over any one else but myself. Ralph Hilton believes otherwise. Ralph became upset over my handling of FZA.ORG, enough so to become motivated to create his Free Zone International web site.

This was the start of Ralph’s implied ‘FreeZone’ authority.

Ralph continued this charade by posting messages to FZA.ORG demanding compliance with his wishes as a ‘FreeZone’ authority. Employing others in his scheme, it seemed as if the entire ‘FreeZone’ demanded that FZA.ORG bow to their wishes. I did not but I will say that their operation did cause the decline of TWO discussion forums at FZA.ORG.

It’s amazing to me that I find no cause of alarm in what others do with their own web sites, and yet Ralph Hilton’s ‘FreeZone’ feels, and acts, the exact opposite.