Gathering Minds

Open-Minded Destructiveness

Destruction, by it’s very nature, destroys. It takes away the regimentation of thoughts, ideas and concepts, it seeks to eliminate fixation. In destruction there can be found motive, or intent. As a basis of operation our intent is what allows us to succeed in whatever endeavor towards which we place our modus operandi, the mind. It is the reason for which we place great trust and solemn faith in it. As a hound dog on it’s flight of fancy, the mind never gives up or let’s go and out of that maelstrom there is placed, for our perusal, the concept of "open mindedness".

An open mind is a mind waiting to be full-filled. An open mind is a mind begging for input. And what does it do with the fabulous input which comes it way? What does it do with all of the data it gleefully consumes? There is but one action it undertakes. Assimilate, digest and regurgitate.

The idea of withholding judgement so as to render it even more forcefully in the future, thanks to the newly acquired data, is just another way of not only fooling ourselves, but of fooling everyone else. We tend to look upon others who practice "open mindedness" as being fair and of higher worth, but is this idea really true? Is this concept merely another way of expressing the mind’s delight in it’s cleverness?

As "open mindedness" is the opposite of "closed mindedness", both should be relegated to the trash heap, left to rot as it will in the light of the sun.

Be it far, far better to have no mind at all.

As the mind turns, so too does the world. But in turning our awareness inward, despite the resistance of the mind as it discloses it’s true nature, the world comes to an end. As our sensory delights disentangle themselves from fixation we free ourselves from our own tortuous devices.

Finding the way home is not an "open minded" affair. It is indeed a very close minded approach as there can be only one home to which we call home. Finding the way home is not a "closed minded" affair. It is indeed a very open minded approach as there can only be one home to which we call home.

Sometimes, bypassing the mind altogether is the only way to find one’s way home.